Reproduction

Contributor
PBS LearningMedia California and WBGH Educational Foundation
Type Category
Instructional Materials
Types
Animation/Movie
Note
This resource, vetted by NSTA curators, is provided to teachers along with suggested modifications to make it more in line with the vision of the NGSS. While not considered to be “fully aligned,” the resources and expert recommendations provide teachers with concrete examples and expert guidance using the EQuIP rubric to adapted existing resources. Read more here.

Reviews

Description

In this activity, the learner explores various ways in which organisms reproduce. The learner discusses the role that reproduction plays in the cycle of life. By watching short videos and participating in follow-up discussion: 1. They observe that no individual organism lives forever and in order to continue species, organisms must pass their genetic instructions on to the next generation. 2. They learn that organisms reproduce asexually, by dividing and producing two identical copies of themselves. 3. They learn that many plants reproduce sexually, often using complex strategies that have evolved over millions of years. 4. They explore the pros and cons of asexual and sexual reproduction and the reasons both strategies persist. The lesson consists of four QuickTime videos and one Flash interactive found at the Url above, however this link is more appropriate for the interactive the" Mating Game": http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/evolution/sex/mating/

Intended Audience

Educator and learner
Educational Level
  • Grade 8
  • Grade 7
  • Grade 6
  • Middle School
Language
English
Access Restrictions

Free access with user action - The right to view and/or download material without financial barriers but users are required to register or experience some other low-barrier to use.

Performance Expectations

MS-LS1-4 Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.

Clarification Statement: Examples of behaviors that affect the probability of animal reproduction could include nest building to protect young from cold, herding of animals to protect young from predators, and vocalization of animals and colorful plumage to attract mates for breeding. Examples of animal behaviors that affect the probability of plant reproduction could include transferring pollen or seeds, and creating conditions for seed germination and growth. Examples of plant structures could include bright flowers attracting butterflies that transfer pollen, flower nectar and odors that attract insects that transfer pollen, and hard shells on nuts that squirrels bury.

Assessment Boundary: none

This resource appears to be designed to build towards this performance expectation, though the resource developer has not explicitly stated so.

Comments about Including the Performance Expectation
The lesson uses 4 QuickTime videos and a Flash interactive to explore the different types of reproductive strategies. Through post-video discussions the learner will explore both asexual and sexual reproductive strategies The differences in genetic information transferred to the offspring through the two forms of reproduction is modeled in the videos and interactive. The questions are used appropriately to model reproduction but does require the educator to guide the learner. This may be accomplished by using graphic organizers that diagram and detail the different models of reproduction before the post video discussion.

Science and Engineering Practices

This resource is explicitly designed to build towards this science and engineering practice.

Comments about Including the Science and Engineering Practice
The videos provide the data of asexual and sexual reproduction in various organisms. The discussion questions provide the analysis and interpretation necessary to address the Practice.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

This resource is explicitly designed to build towards this disciplinary core idea.

Comments about Including the Disciplinary Core Idea
Direct correlation of lesson to Disciplinary Core Idea. An excellent comparison between these two forms of reproduction are visually presented.

Crosscutting Concepts

This resource appears to be designed to build towards this crosscutting concept, though the resource developer has not explicitly stated so.

Comments about Including the Crosscutting Concept
The discussion questions need to be preceded by some graphic organization of the material to better compare the two reproductive strategies and the cause and effect relationship. The educator can front load the comparison of asexual and sexual reproduction by using a Venn Diagram or Double Bubble graphic organizers. Then, after the videos, these can be re-visited these to fully understand the cause and effect relationship seen in the videos.

Resource Quality

  • Alignment to the Dimensions of the NGSS: Elements of the science and engineering practice(s), disciplinary core idea(s), and crosscutting concept(s), work together to support students in three‐dimensional learning to make sense of both asexual and sexual reproduction and their roles in genetic variation.

  • Instructional Supports: Provides opportunities to develop and make sense of the roles of asexual and sexual reproduction in genetic variation. The questions are used appropriately to model reproduction and guide the learner in an understanding of reproductive methods and genetic variation. The educator should require summative graphic organizers that diagram and detail the different models of reproduction before the post video discussion.

  • Monitoring Student Progress: Extensive student monitoring through educator lead discussions that should be enhanced with graphic organizers as additional assessment.

  • Quality of Technological Interactivity: Includes four QuickTime videos to analyze and an interactive to reinforce three-dimensional learning.