Quick or Slow? I've Got to Know!

Contributor
Jeri Faber, educator
Type Category
Instructional Materials
Types
Lesson/Lesson Plan
Note
This resource, vetted by NSTA curators, is provided to teachers along with suggested modifications to make it more in line with the vision of the NGSS. While not considered to be “fully aligned,” the resources and expert recommendations provide teachers with concrete examples and expert guidance using the EQuIP rubric to adapted existing resources. Read more here.

Reviews

Description

In this lesson, students will make claims and use sources to find evidence that natural events, such as earthquakes, volcanoes, weathering, or erosion happen quickly or slowly. Students will discuss their claims as a group.

Intended Audience

Educator
Educational Level
  • Upper Elementary
  • Grade 2
Language
English
Access Restrictions

Free access with user action - The right to view and/or download material without financial barriers but users are required to register or experience some other low-barrier to use.

Performance Expectations

2-ESS1-1 Use information from several sources to provide evidence that Earth events can occur quickly or slowly.

Clarification Statement: Examples of events and timescales could include volcanic explosions and earthquakes, which happen quickly and erosion of rocks, which occurs slowly.

Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include quantitative measurements of timescales.

This resource is explicitly designed to build towards this performance expectation.

Comments about Including the Performance Expectation
Students use multiple sources to research Earth events, such as earthquakes, hurricanes, flooding, mountain and glacier formation, to determine whether the events happen quickly or slowly.

Science and Engineering Practices

This resource is explicitly designed to build towards this science and engineering practice.

Comments about Including the Science and Engineering Practice
Students use multiple resources to construct and explain events that change the Earth slowly or quickly. The lesson does not address designing solutions, but teachers can use another curated resource: “Can We Save This Mountain?” Students may need more time to do this lesson than is discussed by the lesson creator.

This resource is explicitly designed to build towards this science and engineering practice.

Comments about Including the Science and Engineering Practice
Students obtain, evaluate, and communicate evidence from sources that natural events, such as earthquakes, volcanoes, weathering or erosion happen quickly or slowly.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

This resource is explicitly designed to build towards this disciplinary core idea.

Comments about Including the Disciplinary Core Idea
The teacher needs to make sure students are researching quick and slow changes to the Earth such as erosion, weathering, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, mountain and glacier formation.

Crosscutting Concepts

This resource is explicitly designed to build towards this crosscutting concept.

Comments about Including the Crosscutting Concept
Students will research slow and rapid changes to Earth and share their research with others. To further meet this Crosscutting Concept, the teacher can create a concept sort where students sort words, images, and/or descriptions by a slow or a rapid change. For example, the teacher could have a picture of a volcano, a volcano erupting, mountains, glaciers, a mudslide, etc. Using the headers “Slow” and “Rapid”, students will sort the changes.

Resource Quality

  • Alignment to the Dimensions of the NGSS: Students are actively researching changes to Earth. The lesson requires the student to integrate elements of the practices, cross-cutting concepts, and core ideas to make sense of phenomena. The lesson elicits that students show and explain their learning on the recording sheet. The teacher needs to make sure students have the opportunity to search a variety of sources to be able to provide evidence that Earth events can occur quickly or slowly.

  • Instructional Supports: Student evidence collection sheets are provided. The children share their evidence and discuss as a class if the evidence indeed backs up the claim. Discussing the findings as a class helps the students distinguish between explanations that account for gathered evidence and those that do not. The lesson gives an idea about how differentiated instruction can be used by pairing students of different learning levels to work together.

  • Monitoring Student Progress: The student recording sheet provides some evidence of their learning. A rubric could be developed, or anecdotal notes could be taken to assess student learning when students express, clarify, justify, interpret, and represent their ideas on the recording sheet and when responding to peer and teacher feedback.

  • Quality of Technological Interactivity: No technology is included, but students may research via technology to make their claims that Earth changes can be slow or quick.