Making a Landform Model

Contributor
Jeri Faber
Type Category
Instructional Materials
Types
Activity , Lesson/Lesson Plan , Model , Project
Note
This resource, vetted by NSTA curators, is provided to teachers along with suggested modifications to make it more in line with the vision of the NGSS. While not considered to be “fully aligned,” the resources and expert recommendations provide teachers with concrete examples and expert guidance using the EQuIP rubric to adapted existing resources. Read more here.

Reviews

Description

For this lesson, the students first explore the concept of making models by using home-made dough to create landforms.  How and why people use models are then explained.  Then the children create their own model island from their plans developed in the lesson prior to this one by Jeri Faber entitled Planning a Landform Model ( http://betterlesson.com/lesson/635822/planning-a-landform-model).

Intended Audience

Educator and learner
Educational Level
  • Upper Elementary
  • Early Elementary
Language
English
Access Restrictions

Free access - The right to view and/or download material without financial, registration, or excessive advertising barriers.

Performance Expectations

2-ESS2-2 Develop a model to represent the shapes and kinds of land and bodies of water in an area.

Clarification Statement: none

Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include quantitative scaling in models.

This resource appears to be designed to build towards this performance expectation, though the resource developer has not explicitly stated so.

Comments about Including the Performance Expectation
To explicitly address the Performance Expectation, students should design their model to represent a known area.

Science and Engineering Practices

This resource is explicitly designed to build towards this science and engineering practice.

Comments about Including the Science and Engineering Practice
Students develop a model to represent shapes and kinds of land and bodies of water. The student explains what the model represents.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

This resource appears to be designed to build towards this disciplinary core idea, though the resource developer has not explicitly stated so.

Comments about Including the Disciplinary Core Idea
This disciplinary core idea could be explicit if the area of the land and water was predetermined. For example: Are students showing specific land formations and bodies of water in their community, country, continent, or world? Including pictures of land and water phenomena at the beginning of this lesson would help students see the connection between the maps and the shapes and kinds of land and water in an area.

Crosscutting Concepts

This resource appears to be designed to build towards this crosscutting concept, though the resource developer has not explicitly stated so.

Comments about Including the Crosscutting Concept
Students must explain and compare the different landforms and bodies of water on their island model in order to notice patterns for these natural features in the world.

Resource Quality

  • Alignment to the Dimensions of the NGSS: Students are planning and designing an island depicting landforms and bodies of water. To further address the disciplinary core idea, students pick an area in the world to develop a model to show the shapes of land and bodies of water. To include the cross-cutting concept of patterns, students provide verbal explanations of the differences between the bodies of water and shapes of the land.

  • Instructional Supports: Developing the model of the landforms and bodies of water deepens understanding of the practices, disciplinary core ideas, and crosscutting concepts by identifying and building on students’ prior knowledge of the specific landforms and bodies of water. Students justify and represent their ideas and respond to teacher feedback orally about their model. All students would benefit from picture vocabulary cards of the major landforms and various bodies of water.

  • Monitoring Student Progress: No rubric is included, but a formative assessment opportunity is available. As students plan and design their island models on paper and while creating the models, anecdotal notes on each child can be kept, noting any misconceptions or mastery of concepts.

  • Quality of Technological Interactivity: A powerpoint is provided in the lesson that discusses how models can be made in different ways, but resemble the object that it represents.