Let's Get Carried Away!

Contributor
Siemens Foundation and Discovery Education
Type Category
Instructional Materials
Types
Lesson/Lesson Plan
Note
This resource, vetted by NSTA curators, is provided to teachers along with suggested modifications to make it more in line with the vision of the NGSS. While not considered to be “fully aligned,” the resources and expert recommendations provide teachers with concrete examples and expert guidance using the EQuIP rubric to adapted existing resources. Read more here.

Reviews

Description

In this lesson, students use a stream table to model the processes of erosion and stream bed formation. The students make changes to the stream environment and make predictions about how these changes will affect the stream. Then the students study and sketch the resulting streams.

Intended Audience

Educator and learner
Educational Level
  • Elementary School
  • Grade 2
Language
English
Access Restrictions

Free access - The right to view and/or download material without financial, registration, or excessive advertising barriers.

Performance Expectations

2-ESS2-1 Compare multiple solutions designed to slow or prevent wind or water from changing the shape of the land.

Clarification Statement: Examples of solutions could include different designs of dikes and windbreaks to hold back wind and water, and different designs for using shrubs, grass, and trees to hold back the land.

Assessment Boundary: none

This resource is explicitly designed to build towards this performance expectation.

Comments about Including the Performance Expectation
Students will compare solutions to slow down or prevent water from changing the land.

Science and Engineering Practices

This resource is explicitly designed to build towards this science and engineering practice.

Comments about Including the Science and Engineering Practice
A teacher led discussion should occur so students can see how the model represents a real stream and what patterns in the natural world happen to the stream when water is added to represent precipitation, run-off, melting snow/ice, etc. Students could also discuss which parts of the real phenomenon are represented in the model (water, and movement, stream bed) and which parts are different (closed system, no animals or plants) A teacher led discussion should occur so students can see how the model represents a real stream and what patterns in the natural world happen to the stream when water is added to represent precipitation, runoff, melting snow/ice, etc. A quick video (like https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ng7lKDnZns) would provide a real life experience to support student understanding of this phenomenon.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

This resource appears to be designed to build towards this disciplinary core idea, though the resource developer has not explicitly stated so.

Comments about Including the Disciplinary Core Idea
Students should have experience with maps of land and water prior to this lesson.

Crosscutting Concepts

This resource is explicitly designed to build towards this crosscutting concept.

Comments about Including the Crosscutting Concept
Guide students to verbalize the realization that erosion occurs when water carries particles of rock, sand, and soil downstream.

Resource Quality

  • Alignment to the Dimensions of the NGSS: Class discussion is important for children to build understanding of the natural patterns of erosion that occur along streams and how rocks and vegetation help control erosion. The performance expectation is addressed when students make changes to the stream environment and make predictions about how these changes will affect the stream. They then study and sketch the resulting streams, describing the effect that changing the speed of moving water had on the shape of the stream and how vegetation holds the soil in place. The science and engineering practice is met when the students compare and contrast the scale model with a real stream, looking beyond the differences in size and thinking about the fact that most streams have to erode multiple types of rocks and soil instead of just sand. The crosscutting concept of patterns is realized as students observe the movement of sand, soil, and rocks in the stream. To make more science connections, the teacher might consider using videos or other media of real world events and have students consider how people’s actions can increase erosion, and then lead a discussion about soil loss and degradation, habitat loss, and damage to aquatic ecosystems.

  • Instructional Supports: For the teacher, the lesson provides content knowledge about erosion to assist students in making connections about erosion to the real world. Clear instructions with diagrams allow the teacher to replicate the model of the stream. For students with language acquisition barriers, key vocabulary (scale model, erosion, canyon, gully) should be presented before the lesson.

  • Monitoring Student Progress: Two formative assessment pieces are included to monitor student misconceptions, content knowledge, background knowledge, and the student’s learning during the investigation.

  • Quality of Technological Interactivity: - none -