"9 Awesome Science Tricks Using Static Electricity!" Video (Phenomenon)

Contributor
Brusspup Illusions and Science
Type Category
Instructional Materials
Types
Phenomenon
Note
This resource, vetted by NSTA curators, is provided to teachers along with suggested modifications to make it more in line with the vision of the NGSS. While not considered to be “fully aligned,” the resources and expert recommendations provide teachers with concrete examples and expert guidance using the EQuIP rubric to adapted existing resources. Read more here.

Reviews

Description

This video showcases nine static electricity phenomena that can be investigated in the classroom.  The teacher could have students view any three of them to generate and investigate questions about electrical interactions between two objects not in contact with each other. The remaining phenomena could be used to have students apply their knowledge and/or extend their investigations.

Intended Audience

Educator and learner
Educational Level
  • Middle School
  • Grade 3
Language
English
Access Restrictions

Free access - The right to view and/or download material without financial, registration, or excessive advertising barriers.

Performance Expectations

3-PS2-3 Ask questions to determine cause and effect relationships of electric or magnetic interactions between two objects not in contact with each other.

Clarification Statement: Examples of an electric force could include the force on hair from an electrically charged balloon and the electrical forces between a charged rod and pieces of paper; examples of a magnetic force could include the force between two permanent magnets, the force between an electromagnet and steel paperclips, and the force exerted by one magnet versus the force exerted by two magnets. Examples of cause and effect relationships could include how the distance between objects affects strength of the force and how the orientation of magnets affects the direction of the magnetic force.

Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to forces produced by objects that can be manipulated by students, and electrical interactions are limited to static electricity.

This resource was not designed to build towards this performance expectation, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Performance Expectation
Students could view three of the phenomena, then be given time to record their observations and any wonderings they might have. They could then share and organize their observations in a Three-Ring Venn Diagram. This process would highlight the commonalities of the phenomena such as a cloth being used, the rubbing that occurs, and the movement of the objects that results. The synthesis of the observations, along with the questions they have can then be used to investigate that electrical charges can generate a force that causes interactions between two objects not in contact with one another. Note that if PVC pipe is not available for the investigations, students can use balloons or, if latex is a problem, record albums. Finally, note that experiments 1 and 5 are unique to the set in that they involve the rubbing of a styrofoam plate and a polycarbonate sheet respectively to create the charge. This presents the opportunity to apply what they have learned through their investigations to explain what is occurring in these phenomena.

Science and Engineering Practices

This resource was not designed to build towards this science and engineering practice, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Science and Engineering Practice
Students are naturally curious. Engagement in the phenomenon will generate questions such as: Is it the rubbing action that creates the force? Does the number of rubs affect the amount of force generated? Does the type of cloth affect the amount of force generated? These type of questions will enable students to investigate the patterns of cause and effect.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

This resource was not designed to build towards this disciplinary core idea, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Disciplinary Core Idea
Students may not readily know that an electrostatic force is creating the phenomena observed in the video. However, students might have previously experienced tiny shocks, the lifting of their hair or hear the crackle of the charge which will inform them that static electricity is creating that force. Through experimentation students will observe that the properties of the objects, such as the type of material used for rubbing and the distances between the objects that are interacting affect the size (strength) of the force.

Crosscutting Concepts

This resource was not designed to build towards this crosscutting concept, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Crosscutting Concept
Students should be guided to identify cause and effect relationships observed in the phenomenon as they will see for example, that the rubbing of an object (cause) created a force (effect) that enabled interactions between objects not in contact with each other. As students engage in further investigations based on their questions, they might test how, for example, the number of rubs affects the size of the force. These relationship need to be made explicit while students are conducting their investigation as well as during the discussions of their findings.

Resource Quality

  • Alignment to the Dimensions of the NGSS: - none -

  • Instructional Supports: - none -

  • Monitoring Student Progress: - none -

  • Quality of Technological Interactivity: - none -