Glaciers in Alaska

Contributor
Smithsonian.com
Type Category
Instructional Materials
Types
Phenomenon
Note
This resource, vetted by NSTA curators, is provided to teachers along with suggested modifications to make it more in line with the vision of the NGSS. While not considered to be “fully aligned,” the resources and expert recommendations provide teachers with concrete examples and expert guidance using the EQuIP rubric to adapted existing resources. Read more here.

Reviews

Description

The beautiful video offers landscapes covered with slow moving masses of ice (fields) called glaciers. The film would support questions about the phenomenon of glaciers.

Intended Audience

Educator and learner
Educational Level
  • Elementary School
  • Early Elementary
Language
English
Access Restrictions

Free access with user action - The right to view and/or download material without financial barriers but users are required to register or experience some other low-barrier to use.

Performance Expectations

2-ESS2-3 Obtain information to identify where water is found on Earth and that it can be solid or liquid.

Clarification Statement: none

Assessment Boundary: none

This resource was not designed to build towards this performance expectation, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Performance Expectation
The purpose of this resource is to evoke wonder and elicit questions leading to a unit or a series of lessons about where water is found on the Earth, and whether it can be in liquid or solid form.

Science and Engineering Practices

This resource was not designed to build towards this science and engineering practice, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Science and Engineering Practice
If the teacher shows the first half of the video with the sound on, students would be able to obtain some information about glaciers that would nicely inform their questions. For example, the narrator introduces ideas such as: glaciers are formed over very long periods of time; they are relatively permanent as a feature of the land; they flow; and they cover a large portion of the state of Alaska. Later, the teacher would be able to support the Performance Expectation using maps in the classroom or online resources to observe the glaciers in the United States.

This resource is explicitly designed to build towards this science and engineering practice.

Comments about Including the Science and Engineering Practice
The entire video should be viewed to to elicit questions, but the teacher may present the last half, without sound. In the last half of the video, the students will be exposed to different types of glaciers and also witness land masses from the same point of view (aerial). The teacher may choose to stop at specific points in the video to gather and record various observations and related questions.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

This resource was not designed to build towards this disciplinary core idea, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Disciplinary Core Idea
The phenomenon presents a scene that may be familiar for many students, ice and snow, but in an unfamiliar scope and scale for many. Use of this phenomenon also can lead to other Disciplinary Core Ideas components within the Earth’s Systems cluster of Performance Expectations in second grade.

Crosscutting Concepts

This resource was not designed to build towards this crosscutting concept, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Crosscutting Concept
To address the complete Crosscutting Concept, it is important to support students in describing this phenomenon in preparation to comparing it to familiar local events, such as winter snow and ice that accumulates in the playground. Students might keep data of local snow cover by measuring the accumulated snow and ice. They could also observe how local cover advances or recedes similar to that of a glacier.

This resource was not designed to build towards this crosscutting concept, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Crosscutting Concept
Support should be given to students as they look for patterns in how glaciers look, their features and where or not they are found on the Earth. To address the complete Crosscutting Concept, the teacher would need to support students in describing this phenomenon and comparing it to familiar local events such as how winter snow and ice accumulates in the playground. Students could keep data of local snow cover by measuring the accumulated snow and ice. They could observe how local cover advances or recedes like a glacier.

Resource Quality

  • Alignment to the Dimensions of the NGSS: - none -

  • Instructional Supports: - none -

  • Monitoring Student Progress: - none -

  • Quality of Technological Interactivity: The quality in terms of video quality is wonderful.