Chinese Spouting Bowl in Slow Motion (Phenomenon)

Contributor
The Slo Mo Guys: Gavin Free and Dan Gruchy
Type Category
Instructional Materials
Types
Phenomenon
Note
This resource, vetted by NSTA curators, is provided to teachers along with suggested modifications to make it more in line with the vision of the NGSS. While not considered to be “fully aligned,” the resources and expert recommendations provide teachers with concrete examples and expert guidance using the EQuIP rubric to adapted existing resources. Read more here.

Reviews

Description

When watching this video, students will observe that vibrations are created when the handles of the Chinese Spouting Bowl are rubbed, resulting in sound waves that can be observed on the surface of the water in the bowl.  An understanding of amplitude and wavelength can be developed based on these observations. The harder the handles of the bowl are rubbed, the louder the resulting sound and the larger the waves, enabling students to observe patterns in cause and effect relationships.  Since sound is a form of energy that travels in waves, connections can also be made to 4-PS3-2 (energy transfer.)

Intended Audience

Educator and learner
Educational Level
  • Grade 4
Language
English
Access Restrictions

Free access - The right to view and/or download material without financial, registration, or excessive advertising barriers.

Performance Expectations

4-PS4-1 Develop a model of waves to describe patterns in terms of amplitude and wavelength and that waves can cause objects to move.

Clarification Statement: Examples of models could include diagrams, analogies, and physical models using wire to illustrate wavelength and amplitude of waves.

Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include interference effects, electromagnetic waves, non-periodic waves, or quantitative models of amplitude and wavelength.

This resource was not designed to build towards this performance expectation, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Performance Expectation
It is recommended that the viewing of the video start at 1:50 (perhaps with the sound muted). Based on their observations, students can draw initial models of what they think is happening and the patterns they observe in their science notebooks. They could also create models kinesthetically using a rope. The discussion of these models could then lead to an introduction of amplitude and wavelength.

Science and Engineering Practices

This resource was not designed to build towards this science and engineering practice, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Science and Engineering Practice
As they watch the video, students should be encouraged to ask questions, which can be recorded in their notebooks and then on a class chart. Questions may include: How are the waves being generated? What is the relationship between the sound vibrations and the waves being generated? These types of questions will enable students to investigate the patterns of cause and effect. Different sizes of tuning forks struck at different intensities then placed in water will enable students to investigate these cause and effect relationships further and gather firsthand evidence to support claims that they make to answer their questions.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

This resource was not designed to build towards this disciplinary core idea, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Disciplinary Core Idea
Students will observe how waves of the same type increase in amplitude and decrease in wavelength between 2:00 and 3:00 of the video. Having students draw a model of the waves created at the beginning of this segment and comparing it with a model drawn based on observations made at 2:45 of the video is recommended to enhance student understanding of the Disciplinary Core Idea. The teacher can ask questions such as: “How are these models alike? Different? How can we explain the similarities and differences?

This resource was not designed to build towards this disciplinary core idea, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Disciplinary Core Idea
Students can clearly observe the regular patterns of motion made in the water between 2:20 and 2:25 of the video. They can also observe these patterns firsthand using the tuning forks in water activity. To fully address this Disciplinary Core Idea the NGSS Hub resource, Science Shorts: Making Waves is recommended as a follow-up lesson.

Crosscutting Concepts

This resource was not designed to build towards this crosscutting concept, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Crosscutting Concept
Through this video, students will observe that sound vibrations result in waves that are a regular pattern of motion. The harder the handles of the bowl are rubbed, the louder the resulting sound and the larger the waves, enabling students to observe patterns in cause and effect relationships.

Resource Quality

  • Alignment to the Dimensions of the NGSS: - none -

  • Instructional Supports: - none -

  • Monitoring Student Progress: - none -

  • Quality of Technological Interactivity: - none -