Why Do Animals Go There? by Jonathan Rosen

Contributor
Jonathan Rosen
Type Category
Instructional Materials
Types
Informative Text
Note
This resource, vetted by NSTA curators, is provided to teachers along with suggested modifications to make it more in line with the vision of the NGSS. While not considered to be “fully aligned,” the resources and expert recommendations provide teachers with concrete examples and expert guidance using the EQuIP rubric to adapted existing resources. Read more here.

Reviews

Description

Students read or listen to an illustrated book that describes why animals migrate (to find warmer climates, find food and water, lay eggs, etc.). They learn about different types of animals that migrate, such as different types of birds, insects, mammals, fish, and reptiles.

Intended Audience

Learner
Educational Level
  • Grade 3
Language
English
Access Restrictions

Available for purchase - The right to view, keep, and/or download material upon payment of a one-time fee.

Performance Expectations

3-LS4-4 Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.

Clarification Statement: Examples of environmental changes could include changes in land characteristics, water distribution, temperature, food, and other organisms.

Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to a single environmental change. Assessment does not include the greenhouse effect or climate change.

This resource appears to be designed to build towards this performance expectation, though the resource developer has not explicitly stated so.

Comments about Including the Performance Expectation
This book provides many specific examples of when animals move to new locations when the environment changes due to changes in temperature, availability of resources, and/or physical characteristics. As the teacher or students read the book, they can create a class chart (or small group/individual charts) to record each animal, the environmental change, why they migrate, and where they migrate to.

Science and Engineering Practices

This resource appears to be designed to build towards this science and engineering practice, though the resource developer has not explicitly stated so.

Comments about Including the Science and Engineering Practice
Students can use the information they compile in the class chart to support the claim that animals move to new locations when their environment changes so they can no longer get what they need to survive. Depending on students’ experience with constructing explanations, this can be done as a whole class, in small groups, or individually.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

This resource is explicitly designed to build towards this disciplinary core idea.

Comments about Including the Disciplinary Core Idea
Before reading the book, the teacher can ask students what animals need to survive. (This should be a review.) What happens when the environment changes so that animals no longer can get what they need? After gathering information from the book (and other resources) and compiling the class chart, the teacher might ask: What else might happen to animals when the environment changes? [They might be able to stay there and survive and reproduce or they might die.]

Crosscutting Concepts

This resource appears to be designed to build towards this crosscutting concept, though the resource developer has not explicitly stated so.

Comments about Including the Crosscutting Concept
The teacher can use the prompt: [Effect] because [Cause] and ask students to start using this. For example, zebras migrate in Africa to find water because they can’t find water in the dry season.

Resource Quality

  • Alignment to the Dimensions of the NGSS: This resource provides students with relevant evidence that can be used to support the claim that when the environment changes in ways that affect a place’s physical characteristics, temperature, or availability of resources, some organisms move to new locations. Although the book does provide opportunities to focus on the practice of obtaining information, it does not specifically address the practice of constructing explanations--the teacher will need to use the book (perhaps along with other resources) to guide students to construct explanations and share their ideas with others. The crosscutting concept of cause and effect is also not explicitly mentioned, but the scenarios of animal migration will provide clear examples of this.

  • Instructional Supports: The book provides students with relevant phenomena that are accurate and grade-appropriate. The text will be appropriate for lower level readers due to the bolded keywords, simple text, info boxes, engaging visuals , and photo glossary. It can be used in conjunction with another curated resource: Why Do Animals Migrate? by Bobbie Kalman (which is appropriate for higher level readers).

  • Monitoring Student Progress: Before reading the book, the teacher can ask students to write or verbally share ideas to answer the question: “What do you think happens when the environment changes so that animals no longer can get what they need?” This pre-assessment can provide information on student thinking. In addition, student explanations can be assessed to determine student understanding and proficiency in constructing explanations.

  • Quality of Technological Interactivity: This resource does not include a technologically interactive component.