Where in the World is Water?

Contributor
Regents of the University of California
Type Category
Instructional Materials
Types
Lesson/Lesson Plan , Curriculum
Note
This resource, vetted by NSTA curators, is provided to teachers along with suggested modifications to make it more in line with the vision of the NGSS. While not considered to be “fully aligned,” the resources and expert recommendations provide teachers with concrete examples and expert guidance using the EQuIP rubric to adapted existing resources. Read more here.

Reviews

Description

This three part lesson developed by 4H engages students in an interaction “globe” tossing activity, a measuring and analysis of water; and a discussion about conserving water.

Intended Audience

Educator and learner
Educational Level
  • Grade 2
Language
English
Access Restrictions

Free access - The right to view and/or download material without financial, registration, or excessive advertising barriers.

Performance Expectations

2-ESS2-3 Obtain information to identify where water is found on Earth and that it can be solid or liquid.

Clarification Statement: none

Assessment Boundary: none

This resource was not designed to build towards this performance expectation, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Performance Expectation
This lesson has three parts, engaging to young students and addresses the three dimensions of Performance Expectations.

Science and Engineering Practices

This resource was not designed to build towards this science and engineering practice, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Science and Engineering Practice
This practice must focus on qualitative mathematical thinking. The students usually don't fully understand proportions, but they can identify and reason about them. Similarly, the students at this age have a budding understanding of percentages, therefore the teacher would need to consider how to introduce the numbers relative to the students' current learning. The students will enjoy using the measuring spoons to compare water, but would not be expected to fully understand the measurements.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

This resource was not designed to build towards this disciplinary core idea, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Disciplinary Core Idea
The lesson would more fully address the Core Idea element if the globe tossing includes the question, “Is that water in liquid or solid form?” But why the water is in these different forms would also need to be reasoned out by students. Students will need many rich learning experiences with water before they are able to be assessed on this Performance Expectation.

Crosscutting Concepts

This resource was not designed to build towards this crosscutting concept, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Crosscutting Concept
More explicit attention could be paid to the Crosscutting Concept; Patterns, in order to ensure that students engage with all three dimensions. The teacher may ask the students to explain what a pattern is and then ask if they can use a pattern to describe water on the planet. She could also have students ask questions at the close of this lesson and then categorize the questions according to which ones use the lens of patterns.

Resource Quality

  • Alignment to the Dimensions of the NGSS: The three dimensions work together to support students to make sense of phenomena and/or to design solutions to problems. However, they are implicit. The lesson was written before the writing of NGSS and has not been updated. Hence, the Crosscutting Concepts are not apparent without modifications. Specific guiding questions that ask about patterns and support the student in looking for and describing the patterns in the shapes and the kinds of water would benefit the three-dimensionality. Another support for the lesson for the phenomenon and addressing the local context would be to explicitly connect to a local problem related to water in the community that the students would try to address.

  • Instructional Supports: The application to the students' daily lives and water conservation makes this lesson relevant to even young students. The discussion builds connections between students lived experiences and the science taught in school. The students deepen the practice of mathematical thinking to consider a phenomenon that has authentic alignment to engineering problems.

  • Monitoring Student Progress: There are no embedded formative assessments or rubrics to track student progress. The teacher could ask the students in small groups or partners to discuss whether or not this statement is true, “most of the water in the planet is in the ocean, but there are other places where there is water.” The teacher could have the partners explain their thinking, looking for how the students back up their claims, as she moves around the classroom.

  • Quality of Technological Interactivity: There are no interactive components to the lesson as part of technology.