Ocean Predators Feeding

Contributor
BBC Earth
Type Category
Instructional Materials
Types
Phenomenon
Note
This resource, vetted by NSTA curators, is provided to teachers along with suggested modifications to make it more in line with the vision of the NGSS. While not considered to be “fully aligned,” the resources and expert recommendations provide teachers with concrete examples and expert guidance using the EQuIP rubric to adapted existing resources. Read more here.

Reviews

Description

This BBC Earth 3.5 minute video may be used as a phenomenon to initiate student three-dimensional thinking about the role of group behavior on both individual and species survival. The video shows cooperative group feeding behavior in several oceanic predators - gannets, dolphins, Bryde’s whales, and sharks - as well as the group avoidance behavior of the target prey - a school of sardines. The phenomenon could engage students along with the following driving questions:

  • What evidence is seen in the film to support the idea that cooperative hunting behavior may benefit the individual and the species?

  • What evidence is seen that cooperative avoidance behavior of the prey may also be beneficial?

  • Do you see any evidence of intraspecific cooperation?

  • How do you think any of these behaviors may have originated?

  • What factors may contribute to the development of cooperative group behavior?

Intended Audience

Educator and learner
Educational Level
  • High School
Language
English
Access Restrictions

Free access - The right to view and/or download material without financial, registration, or excessive advertising barriers.

Performance Expectations

HS-LS2-8 Evaluate the evidence for the role of group behavior on individual and species’ chances to survive and reproduce.

Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on: (1) distinguishing between group and individual behavior, (2) identifying evidence supporting the outcomes of group behavior, and (3) developing logical and reasonable arguments based on evidence. Examples of group behaviors could include flocking, schooling, herding, and cooperative behaviors such as hunting, migrating, and swarming.

Assessment Boundary: none

This resource was not designed to build towards this performance expectation, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Performance Expectation
Students can observe the different species of predators, as well as the prey, to see how group behavior may benefit the individual and species’ chances to survive and reproduce. Teachers may want to ask different students to focus on different species and to look for patterns in their behavior. What evidence do they see in the film that cooperative hunting, as well as cooperative avoidance behavior, may benefit the individual and the species? As students watch the film, they should be encouraged to think of questions that come to mind as they make careful observations of the phenomenon.

Science and Engineering Practices

This resource was not designed to build towards this science and engineering practice, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Science and Engineering Practice
Teachers may want to show the video more than once. For example, the first time, allow students to view it prior to any discussion. Pause after this first showing and ask students to share their thoughts about their observations. After this discussion, show the video a second time, but encourage students to focus on a particular species and to be willing to share questions that come to their minds as they make careful observations. A third viewing may even be beneficial to give students a final opportunity to gather some evidence to support explanations that may answer their questions. As students consider questions and observe the phenomenon, it may also be helpful for the students to create a simple food web to show the relationships among the organisms and identify the roles of predator, prey, and competitor.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

This resource was not designed to build towards this disciplinary core idea, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Disciplinary Core Idea
The video may be used to help generate discussion about relatedness and survival. Teachers can ask students why they think these different species - both predators and prey - don’t go it alone. Teachers may want to encourage students to consider the various factors that might make group behavior advantageous in some environments over others. Teachers may want to encourage students to pay particular attention to the predatory behavior of the gannets, which involves not only diving, but extending their distance into the ocean by swimming. This predator strategy is a great example to show how group behavior has evolved to increase survival rate.

Crosscutting Concepts

This resource was not designed to build towards this crosscutting concept, but can be used to build towards it using the suggestions provided below.

Comments about Including the Crosscutting Concept
When the students watch the video, teachers should encourage them to make careful observations of any patterns that they see in the various group behaviors. Encourage students to make comparisons across species boundaries and to identify any similarities or differences. Students may want to make sense of these observations as they look for evidence to support their explanations about how these behaviors may increase the chances of survival for the different species they see in the video.

Resource Quality

  • Alignment to the Dimensions of the NGSS: - none -

  • Instructional Supports: - none -

  • Monitoring Student Progress: - none -

  • Quality of Technological Interactivity: - none -